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  • Writer's pictureAdonis Maglis

Dogs wellbeing during grooming...

Updated: Dec 14, 2022


As #doggroomers there are times where we encounter #challenging and upsetting situations. #doggrooming in itself is not an easy job by any means.


At times a challenge for #groomers is to have to work with a #difficultdog who stresses and tries to inflict injury. It's tough to come to terms with the fact that at times you have to stop and refuse to groom a dog. Despite your #training, #qualifications, #experience, and strategies employed in order to calm the #dog so you can #groom them #safely and #humanely, there are cases where you simply have to refer the #dog to a #vet.


In these instances, #groomers may encourage clients to look for other options if their pet is displaying behaviours that puts both the #pet and the #groomer at a risk of injury.


The #grooming - may be ‘successful’ and complete, and the #owner and the #groomer may be happy with the haircut, however, if the #dog is super anxious and can't cope with the #grooming process, other interventions must take place. When nothing else has worked, the #pet may benefit from some natural or medical #vet interventions and a #vetgroom.


The #wellbeing and #welfare of the #dog is our first and foremost #priority as #doggroomers.


As #professionals we have to recognise the limits of the #animal we are working with and our own. We must not put the #dog or the #groomer in a dangerous or risky situation that could end up in injury.


We don’t always know the reasons a #dog behaves in a certain way and what kind of history and negative #experiences or lack of #training contribute to the #aggressive behaviour.


It's ok to refuse service if we are to ensure the #groomers’ safety and the #dogs’ well-being.

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